How to Use QuickBooks For Job Costing – Understanding Job Cost Reports

QuickBooks offers a plethora of standard job costing reports designed to give you the information you need to manage your customer and jobs.  Some of these reports are only found in the Contractors and Accountants editions, but many are available in other versions of QuickBooks as well.

Jobs & Profitability Reports:

These reports can be found in Pro, Premier and Enterprise in Reports > Jobs, Time & Mileage.  

Job Profitability Summary – This report summarizes how much profit your company has made from each customer.

Job Profitability Detail – This report drills down to the detailed costs and revenues for each job phase you billed to the selected customer or job, so you can see which parts of the job were profitable and which parts were not.

Item Profitability – This report summarizes how much profit you have made from each item or job phase you sell.

Profit & Loss by Job – This report shows how much profit you are making or losing on each job.

Unbilled Costs by Job – This report lists the costs you assigned to a specific customer or job but have not yet billed as reimbursable expenses.

Job Estimates Reports:

These reports can be found in Pro, Premier and Enterprise in Reports > Jobs, Time & Mileage. 

Job Estimates vs. Actuals Summary – This report summarizes how accurately your company estimated job-related costs and revenues. The report summarizes estimated to actual costs and estimated to actual revenue for all customers.

Job Estimates vs. Actuals Detail – This report drills down to the detailed costs and revenues for the selected customer or job. It compares estimated to actual costs and estimated to actual revenue for each job phase you billed.  That way, you can see which parts of the job you estimated accurately and which parts you did not.

Job Progress Invoices vs. Estimates – This report compares each estimate with progress invoices based on the estimate. For each customer or job, this report shows whether or not the estimate is active, the estimate total, the total invoiced from the estimate on progress invoices, and the percentage of the estimate already invoiced on progress invoices.

Item Estimates vs. Actuals – This report summarizes how accurately your company estimated costs and revenues for the items and job phases you sell. The report summarizes estimated to actual cost and estimated to actual revenue for all your items.

Estimates by Job – This report lists all active estimates assigned to a customer or job.

Open Purchase Orders by Job – This report shows the remaining purchase order line items that have not been received and their expected delivery date for each customer or job.

Job Costs & Bills Reports:

These reports can only be found in the Contractors and Accountants editions of QuickBooks.  Some of them are also available in the Professional Services edition.  

Costs to Complete by Job Summary – Once you enter how far along each of your jobs are, this report summarizes the cost to complete each of your jobs that have active estimates. It also shows how far you are over or under your estimate.

Costs to Complete by Job Detail – This report drills down to the detailed estimated cost by phase to complete the selected customer or job, and how far you are over or under your estimate.

Job Costs by Vendor and Job Summary - This report lists the job-related expenses you have incurred for each job, subtotaled by vendor.

Job Costs by Vendor and Detail – This report shows a detailed list of all the job-related expenses you have incurred for each vendor, subtotaled by job.

Job Costs Job and Vendor Summary - This report lists the job-related expenses you have incurred for each vendor, subtotaled by job.

Job Costs Job and Vendor Detail – This report shows a detailed list of all the job-related expenses you have incurred for each vendor, subtotaled by job.

Job Costs Detail - This report lists the expenses you have incurred for each job. This report is useful if you need to break out all material supplier purchases, all subcontractors bills, and all the labor costs for each job.

Unpaid Bills by Job – This report lists the bills you have not yet paid, sorted by customers and jobs. It lists only bills with an associated customer or job. This report is useful if you wait to pay vendor bills for a specific job when you receive a payment from the customer.

Unpaid Job Bills by Vendor – This report shows all bills you have not yet paid, sorted by vendor or subcontractor, and lists any customer or job associated with each item on the bill.

Expenses Not Assigned to Jobs – This report lists expenses that you have not assigned to a customer or job, totaled by vendor. Use this report to help identify costs that you may have forgotten to pass along to your customers.

Job Status – This report lists information for each active customer and job.

Customizing Reports:

One of the wonderful things about QuickBooks is how easy it is to customize reports and then memorize them for future use.  At the top of each report is a Modify Report button.  Here, you can change the way it looks as well as move, sort and subtotal the data in it.  

An even more powerful feature is report filtering.  Each filter represents a specific way you can restrict the scope of the report. When you select a filter, QuickBooks displays fields for you to fill in. The fields ask for information that QuickBooks needs to know to apply the filter to the report.

Once you have a particular report customized just the way you want, you can easily memorize it for future use by clicking the Memorize button.

If you need additional assistance, please call our QuickBooks technical support line at 888-351-5285.  We are here to help you get the most out of QuickBooks!

The Internet Job Posting

How To Write A Successful Internet Job Posting?
The key to a successful Internet job posting is first recognizing that it is not a print classified advertisement. An Internet job posting is interactive, and requires a good understanding of interactive marketing. One of the greatest challenges contractors face when posting jobs online, is recognizing that they must change their traditional job posting habits. An online job posting will not do well if written like a print classified ad. It must be thought more like an interactive marketing campaign for the entire firm. The Marketing Department rather than the HR Department should write it.

Update the Company Web Site
The company web site is rapidly becoming the first point of contact for most job seekers or prospective clients. Contractors should update their corporate web site so that it provides a professional and interactive presentation of the firm, its goals, key personnel, corporate culture, top achievements, and business philosophy. In fact, every marketing resource available to the contractor should be utilized to make the corporate web site the best it can be. Although most job boards provide hot links to company web sites, some do not. Either way, job seekers are likely to independently surf the Internet in order to locate a contractor’s web site, relevant press releases/news, before submitting their resume.

Keywords Rule
In the fast paced world of Internet surfing, most job seekers will only take the time to view the top 20 search results. Making it to the top usually is about keywords. They often make the difference between a successful job posting and a waste of time.Contractors should put the right keywords in the right place so that the right people can find their job postings. Online job postings are not viewed the way print classified ads are viewed. Online job postings are hidden within databases containing thousands of records, and they must be called up for a job seeker to view them. This process up may take the form of keyword selection in a search engine or any number of methods with point and click directories. It’s important for contractors to study the job posting and keyword guidelines of the hosting job board since they will differ from site to site. Many job boards will rank or prioritize job postings within their database by title, membership status, date, keywords or other less obvious means. Adding keywords properly assures that a job posting will find its way to the top of the job board’s search results. Adding keywords improperly may result in having the job posting deleted by the hosting job board or simply lost in the volumes of database records that job seekers never find. While identifying the best keywords for a job posting, contractors should determine which words the job seeker will select in utilizing the job board’s search engine – and include all relevant occupational-specific terms (i.e. Hard Bid Estimator or value engineering). To cover all the bases, It is a good idea to use multiple words or synonyms that may mean the same thing. For example, if the job location is in a lesser-known town such as Maitland, Florida but near a well-known city like Orlando, Florida, then Orlando should be added as a keyword. Most job boards require keywords to be added in a special field, in a particular fashion (using quotes, comas, etc.). Job postings that do not offer a special field for keywords usually require the contractor to add keywords to the Job Description, Job Requirements or other searchable fields. When adding keywords to a Job Description, contractors should write the keywords into complete sentences so that the content flows as a logical composition.

Make It Believable
Job Postings should be believable and complete if they want to attract the top talent. Most executive job seekers are interested in job postings that contain detailed job descriptions and job requirements. Many want to see salary and information about the company. Others want to know job location. Most job boards claim that a well-written job posting can achieve many more qualified applications than a poorly written job posting. Fortunately many job boards offer FAQ’s and job posting guidelines to help contractors get the most from their job posting. Some provide statistical analysis of individual job postings. These statistics often show the number of job seeker views and applications submitted to each job posting. Contractors can use statistics to evaluate their results and modify the job posting accordingly. The more details provided in a job posting the more credible the job and the better the fit. Therefore, more job seekers will respond. Contractors should be specific about the scope and type of work, the hours, the job goals, the salary and the location. They should also make sure all fields are appropriately filled in completely. Some boards allow for job postings to be previewed prior to going live helping contractors see the completed job posting the way job seekers will see it. Many job boards allow for real time editing during the advertisements flight.

Manage Style
Unlike classified print ads, online job postings usually allow for pages of copy. allows for three thousand characters in the Job Description and three thousand characters in the Job Requirements fields – or about two typewritten pages. Contractors should write clearly and present text in an organized, logical manner. Job postings should read like a composition and not a print classified ad. Sentences can be short but they should always be complete sentences containing correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar. The copy should include natural paragraphs, with line breaks, so that the job seeker can find relevant information quickly and easily. Writing in all Caps, using excessive exclamation points, or adding acronyms and abbreviations will reduce the credibility of the job posting and potentially result in job deletion by the hosting job board. Acronyms and abbreviations should also be spelled out since job seekers usually search by complete words.

Read Job Posting Guidelines
Most job boards have Terms of Use agreements that members/users must agree to – in order to utilize their service. It’s important that contractors read and understand the terms that relate to job postings and keywords to get the best results. It is typical for job boards with have high quality control standards to delete or edit up to 25% of all job postings as being inappropriate. Most job boards do not allow for listing of emails, URL’s, use of copyrighted material, defamatory remarks, false, inaccurate or misleading information, illegal or unethical content. Job postings that encourage job seekers to email for more details, are usually prohibited.

Follow up
Contractors should immediately follow up on all qualified applications that have been submitted. Peter Weddles at says, “Speed is everything in hiring top talent.” Within ten days, the top 10% of job seekers are gone. Once someone desirable is identified, it’s important to act on that person right away. Today’s recruitment market is highly competitive and the hiring cycle should not allow for any dead time between in-house interviewing schedules and final selection. Contractors should not leave job seekers hanging more than five to seven days without a scheduled follow-up meeting. Otherwise, they risk losing the job seeker entirely. There needs to be top-level management involved with all key hires. Involving top management makes job seekers feel that the hire is an important position, and that they have personally been selected as the “candidate of choice” by the top brass. Contractors should begin closing the deal the moment they know that they want someone for hire. They should not let up until an offer is on the table and accepted.

Common Internet Job Posting Fields & Their Purpose

Job Titles
Titles should be industry-specific and familiar to job seekers since they will use keyword search for positions according to standard job titles. The Job Title field is not the field to market the job posting (like with a classified ad). The Job Title field should be used primarily to have the job posting found by job seekers. Adding appropriate keywords, in the appropriate place, is far more important than catchy job titles that never get seen. However, it is acceptable to add relevant, occupational-defining adjectives to the basic Job Title (such as On-site Architectural Project Manager, Conceptual Chief Estimator, Hospital Flooring Project Engineer, and Veteran Concrete Superintendent).

Job Descriptions
Job descriptions typically focus on job responsibilities, duties, scope, achievements and goals to be accomplished. The clearer the description, the more likely qualified job seekers will apply. Job descriptions should focus on the job seeker’s needs and not just the position. Job descriptions should be written from the job seeker’s perspective. They should also answer the question, “Why would a job seeker want to apply for this job?” Contractors should describe the best parts of the job, interesting challenges, future job opportunities, reporting relationships, and why the position is available. It’s important to sell the overall career opportunity while not just describing it. If a job seeker takes the job, what will their lives be like? Use word pictures and try to communicate desirable images that the job seeker can visualize, compelling him/her to change jobs. For example: “work in a progressive environment where you can learn more in six months than you may have in the last six years”, or “walk into your private office and join a team of enthusiastic professionals who are building the next great management firm”. If there is not a job-posting field that lists specific benefits and perks, add them into the job description. Job benefits include things such as flex time, work at home, child care, above average medical benefits, company vehicle, education reimbursement, country club membership, and other special offerings. However, contractors should recognize that the Job Description field should not describe the company, the job requirements, the job location, salary, or anything else unless there is no other appropriate field in which to post this information. Inappropriate content (or placing content in the wrong fields) may result in the job posting being edited or deleted.

Company Profile
Most job boards allow for a hot link to the contractor’s corporate web site. Many job boards, in addition to offering a hot link, will offer a special Company Profile field. Contractors should completely fill in this field. This will add valuable content and keywords to the job board’s database in order to improve their chances of being found by searching job seekers. A Company Profile field creates an additional promotional opportunity for the firm and the job position. Use this field to describe what the company does – addressing key elements like organization size, location, benefits, company goals, mission, management style, employee quality of life and what makes the firm special. Contractors should also include information about the qualities desired in all team members. This field often provides for limitless content and is the least edited by the hosting job board. Some job boards even allow for multiple company profiles that can be individually linked to a respective job posting (allowing recruiters to add information on each respective client, and contractors the opportunity to promote information about their various divisional offices).

Contact Information
It is essential to put contact information on all forms and in all appropriate fields. Contractors should make it easy for a job seeker to apply. Most job seekers prefer email. Some prefer using mail, fax or phone calls before sending their confidential resume. It is appropriate to specify a preferred contact method, and request that all applications include the respective Job ID. By having several contact methods and the contact name (not just a department) of a real person, a job seeker is more likely to believe the job is valid and apply.

Job Identification (ID)
For job postings, contractors should use a tracking system to provide a unique Job ID for each job posting and require that job seekers reference this ID on applications whether faxed, emailed, or mailed. This allows contractors to know which site – and specifically which ad – brought in the respective application. Information as to where the best applications come from will help contractors to know what job boards have been the most productive sources of talent.

Job Responsibilities
Job Responsibilities are simply the job requirements for the position. In order to get the best response, contractors should list why the requirements are there. Examples would be: “A Bachelor of Arts Degree is required to help lead Corporate Communications” or “We require seven years of project management experience for commercial building projects. This position will manage three Project Managers and seven Project Engineers”. Make clear the “required” qualifications and the “desired” skills. Avoid clich’s or trite phrases like “self-motivated”, “team player”, and “fast-paced” (making the job posting appear common). Contractors can also use the Job Responsibilities field as an eliminator of unwanted resumes by making qualifying statements (“Applicants must have a minimum of six consecutive years with the same general contractor. Otherwise, please do not apply.”). In order to eliminate many unwanted job seekers, contractors can also add qualifying phrases such as “background checks are performed in the hiring process” or “personality testing is used in the hiring process”.

Many contractors refuse to post salary information in job postings. Salary figures make job postings credible, and substantially improve the job seeker response rate. It is also one of the most widely searched fields on a job posting. Job seekers are typically more interested in the salary than any other item in a job description. According to executive recruiter, Chuck Groom of CC Group, Inc., money is one of the top reasons why people leave their job. Job seekers do not want to waste time with a job that may not pay what they require. When a salary figure is lacking, they will assume that the contractor may be embarrassed by the level of salary level – or have something to hide. Phrases such as “Salary is commensurate with experience, N/A, Open, or Depends on experience” do not prove effective. They will actually significantly reduce response rate to a job posting.

Work Status
An important qualifier, that is often overlooked, is the work status field. With the international reach of the Internet, more and more foreigners (without valid work visas) are applying to United States job postings. Contractors can eliminate many foreign applications by simply stating “applicants must be United States citizens”, or “only United States citizens or those with valid work visas need apply”, or “you must have clearance to work in the United States to be considered for this position”.

Most major job boards require the location field to be completed. Although many recruiters refuse to identify job locations (in fear of disclosing their clients need for confidentiality), listing the job location is one of the main fields that job seekers search. Job seekers from all over the country/world may see the job posting. Without a valid city noted, job seekers must guess the job location. They often will not apply because they think that the posting is in an undesirable location, or that it’s invalid to serve only as a ploy to collect resumes.

Best Places to Post an Internet Job Posting
There are several good choices for contractors who want to post their jobs online. However, the key is to find job boards that to provide the “right” viewers – as well as a large volume of “right” viewers. Contractors want their job posting to be seen by as many relevant viewers as possible. However, although most job boards charge similar fees for services, their volume of viewers can vary dramatically. Many contractors will choose to post jobs online with traditional, well-known, off-line businesses that have a job board presence online. However, the online job posting business (like any Internet business) is a unique business that requires an entirely different set of rules and business acumen. The off-line leaders are rarely the leaders in the online world. In selecting the right job board, contractors should compare results based on verifiable industry standards. One way to make an accurate comparison is through Amazon’s Alexa Research, which can be downloaded at and easily attached to a web browser. Once installed, this tool will indicate a web site’s visitor traffic (based on a common standard, and measured against the entire seventeen million plus web-sites currently on the Internet).

Quitting a Job – Before You Quit Your Job, Some Things to Consider

Some Things You’ll Learn About:

  • Things to consider before you quit your job
  • What to consider before you quit your job improperly
  • We’ll review typical reasons why you would want to quit your job
  • Alternatives to quitting a job
  • Unemployment possibilities will be discussed and questions answered such as: “Can you collect unemployment if you quit your job?”
  • How to quit your job gracefully and professionally
  • How to quit your job and get the last laugh
  • How to quit your job without burning any bridges. This should not be taken lightly!
  • If you want to quit your night job, some things to consider that are different from if you wanted to quit your day job. You’ll want to hear this…so don’t quit your night job yet!
  • Things to know if you want to quit your job to start a home business of any kind
  • Make a game of it!

NOTE: The information you receive from reading this article will give you some things to think about that you may not have considered but ultimately, remember that nobody can make that decision for you. You should always do your best to find out everything you can before you take any action.

Think of this scenario: you now have quit your job and are hunting for another…feverishly, urgently, with very little time before you go under financially. Now that’s stress! Not only that, you left for the wrong reasons. You may have quit your job because of stress, a bad coworker or boss, poor conditions, no recognition or whatever it is but it won’t matter to the unemployment office when they have a line of people waiting for benefits. Bottom Line: Do not quit your job before you have another one lined up! When you have another job lined up then you should quit your job. Nevertheless, quit your job gracefully and professionally. Let’s find out the Ins and Outs of quitting your job…

The first thing to consider is CAN you quit your job from a financial standpoint? Do you have the reserves in place (money in the bank) or another job lined up BEFORE you quit? Think of it this way, the moment you quit, you free that position up for the LINE OF PEOPLE waiting to get your job! If you do not know how to quit your job properly, depending upon the circumstances, you may very well burn a bridge. In this day and age that is not a wise idea! After you quit your job it’s far too late to try to retrace your steps and go back begging on your hands and knees should you need that job back! I’ll show you how to resign from your job in a respectful and professional manner to prevent you from burning any bridges.

If You Quit Your Job Improperly:

You may very well not only burn a bridge, so to speak, but this may also follow you for some time and become a thorn in your side when you apply for a job and well into the interview process. Even though companies have a very fine line they have to walk when an inquiry regarding a former employee surfaces it can be difficult at times to prove if something was said during the conversation since you are not even there.

You will likely be asked in an interview in one form or another some questions about your previous job. People can tell when you are not being completely honest by such things as your body language, tone of your voice, even at times when your blood pressure goes up and your heart starts to race. You may even start to perspire a bit and so on.

If you quit your job prematurely you may very well jeopardize your financial situation. It is easy to make it worse in one form or another even when you have the right intentions but you merely miss the mark of what your goals are versus what reality is. That is a hard lesson to learn.

Typical Reasons Why People Quit Their Job:

The second thing to consider is WHY do you want to quit your job? Is it too stressful? Not getting along with the boss? Just simply hate your job? Is it for health reasons? Do you have challenges when it comes to performing the job duties? Do you have to move? Are you not advancing as quickly as you thought possible? Let’s address a few of these for starters.

If your answer is somewhere in the “hate my job”, “can’t advance”, “can’t get along with the boss” arena then there may be a better alternative to quitting a job which we will discuss shortly. If it is for health (including stress) or anything that falls close to this you have a possible reason to quit your job. Do not take this lightly. If the job is high stress and/or your health is suffering then speak to your physician about this. There may be medical options available for you that will require your doctors’ endorsement. This may also protect your position/job for the time being. This is typically a protected area depending upon the state and area you live in. Let’s get into the other reasons why you want to quit your job.

If you are quitting a job to move and the move is a ‘must do’ or ‘no option’ sort of thing then it’s pretty much said and done. You should quit your job for these reasons. Just make sure you are moving for the right reasons. If you quit your job to take care of a family member or for a better job, to move to a better area to bring up your kids or even just a better area in general then you should quit your job. Follow the section about how to quit your job gracefully but remember to have another job lined up if at all possible before you give notice.

Alternatives to Quitting a Job:

Before you quit your job, ask yourself this question… Am I the type of employee I would hire (meaning you)? Would you hire YOU if you owned a company? If the answer is not a quick yes then maybe a change in your work activities is in order. Are you on time? Do you take only the allotted breaks and for only the time specified? Do you go above and beyond what is required of your job even a little bit? If all you are there for is a paycheck and all that you ever do is the minimum at your job, you will struggle with this quite possibly for the rest of your life. I’m not kidding. When you step it up just a bit your employer sees you as a bigger asset to the company. Deliver more than the minimum, do your job as BEST as you can! I don’t care what it is, give it your all and you will be recognized as a great worker! Oh yes, one very simple thing you can do to really improve how you are perceived is to SMILE! Now, would YOU hire you?

If you are having issues with your Boss or even another worker, get those issues addressed as soon as possible. If you have a union or some other governing bodies (including your Human Resources Department) then contact them to find out your options as well as the proper procedures to follow.

Communication is key and this goes hand in hand with people skills and a little bit of finesse. So, be polite, be patient and be open for change. Pointing the finger at someone else assigning blame will not work. I don’t care if you were right or wrong, if you create a conflict it will likely compound. I am not saying to roll over though. Stand your ground (if it’s worth standing on) and state the facts. Not possibilities or speculations, just the facts. Keep any documents that support these facts or keep a log book if necessary. Remember the old cliche that addresses winning the battle but losing the war? Keep that in mind.

Your company is likely to have a process to follow for issues like this. Follow them. The chain of command (management hierarchy) is there for a reason. Use it! Stick with it until you can get some sort of resolution. There is nothing wrong with respectfully speaking with your boss about the issue even if you don’t get along with him/her and want to resolve it. Any professional will see it as an attempt to fix a problem and not take it personally. Perhaps you do things that your boss doesn’t like and it is eating at him/her just as much as his/her actions eat at you? Level the playing field and you will likely be respected as a professional.

Is a transfer to another department or location a possibility? This may save you a lot of grief versus to quit your job over something that could have been overcome with a simple transfer.

Finally, if you can’t seem to get a resolution, then start looking for another job! Don’t quit your job because you hate it, can’t get along with someone and so on. That is a foolish thing to do. However, my own personal ‘standard’ if you will, for quitting your job is right here:

- Only quit your job after you have another job lined up, then give the appropriate (at least) 2 weeks’ notice politely and in written form giving the date of your last day. Keep working hard!
- Only quit your job after you have your financial needs met (like quitting the employee work force to become an entrepreneur…see the business section below) and also with at least 2 weeks’ notice, in writing, as above. Again, keep working hard!

Unemployment Possibilities:

In general there is only one area that MIGHT allow you to leave your job and that is for medical reasons. This is an area that can get very convoluted depending upon your state labor laws, so check with them to find out the particulars for your area. If your job is aggravating an injury and the employer is not accommodating you appropriately or in a timely manner than you MIGHT be able to quit your job and get unemployment benefits but I would not hold your breath….check it out thoroughly before you take that step! With people standing in line at many unemployment agencies they may have even clamped down even further in this area by now so even if you THINK you can just quit your job and draw unemployment, check with the unemployment office FIRST.

If you are already working while drawing unemployment then be aware that if you quit a job (or can’t go to work because of requiring a doctors release) the unemployment department may very well see the drop in hours and halt your benefits while a review of your case unfolds. Remember, your benefits will typically STOP while they perform this review so be very careful with your decisions. This review can take up to a month or more!

Ways to Quit Your Job:

How to quit your job gracefully and professionally: Your letter of resignation should only highlight the positive points of your work at your company. No slander or finger pointing. Simply point out that you are leaving on whatever date and you enjoyed your time here. If it’s for another position, state it is for another position but leave the company name and such out of it. Keep it general, positive and professional. There are plenty of sample letters that you can find in a web search.

How to quit your job and get the last laugh: This is more for your own personal giggles and if used will likely result in you not laughing for long. Do not use this unless you understand the ramifications and have become independently wealthy. So, here it is. Explain in your letter of resignation that you have been told by your physician specialist in whatever field (a little research here to make sure make believe names of ailments match with the right kind of doctor) that you have been diagnosed with a terminal ailment, disease or whatever. Maybe something like Caribbean Getaw ay Syndrome or GoN2 Bora Bora Disease. Explain that the first signs of which are currently appearing and they start with the loss of sight. Then proclaim that you can’t see yourself working for them any more! Righteous!

How to quit your job without burning any bridges: This should not be taken lightly! Even though the last entry was somewhat comical it is highly recommended you keep that to yourself. DO NOT act on it. Quit your job gracefully and professionally. Period.

Quit Your Night Job? Are you crazy?

If you want to quit your night job, there is one thing to consider that does not apply to wanting to quit your day job and that is the shift itself. Sure, it can be hard on your family life, social life and so on but you have an advantage with a night job. You see, you can not only go on interviews during the day and keep up the job search but you also have fewer managers during a night job than you would have on a day job. Try the other possibilities like transfers or addressing some of the issues you have with HR or similar to keep from just outright quitting your job. Consider it a stepping stone to bigger and better things! It may even be plausible to address your concerns directly but in a non-threatening, open and friendly way. Do whatever you can to get the situation either rectified or at least reduced in intensity.

If You Want to Quit Your Job To Start a Home Business, Consider This:

If you have or want to start your own home business ONLY QUIT YOUR JOB after you have surpassed the gross pay from your job and have one year of wages/salary in savings (again, gross pay). Oh yes, and no bills! In this regard, when working your business part time (and while you are still working a job) limit yourself in a new business to 10 hours per week until you get it built up! Then, up it to 20 hours but remember that it is time spent WORKING your business, not tying yourself up answering emails, driving to the store to get supplies and so on. That is getting lost in the ‘putting out fires’ routine and is not ACTIVELY BUILDING YOUR BUSINESS. The time you spend should be productive, quality time. You still have a life to live and need a balance between work and recreation, family time too. You are no good to anyone if you die in the process so create a balance and spend quality time in each area of your life. Your family and your business will thank you! When you reach this point (No bills, one year savings, greater pay)then you should quit your job. No doubt!

NOTE: I recently witnessed a VERY successful speaker divulge a lesson learned that catapulted her business success. She was working 100 hours per week and making really good money, but when she cut her hours to 20 hours per week, her income quadrupled! Now, this may not be typical in the sense that you will get the same result bu tit illustrates how honing her activities to only those that were productive can result in HUGE results. In essence, she was wasting 80 hours of her week! Regardless if you double, triple or even retain the same income level for a fraction of the work, pay attention to the quality of work you are doing. If you are not growing your business then you are stuck in it and that is too much like a job!

Lastly, sometimes making a game out of your job can help. Not in a foolish sense but sometimes you just need to create a routine where you need to challenge yourself to make the job more interesting, and thereby improve your outlook of that job. You may even find you actually like it!